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04.08.2018

August 4 - the birthday of champagne. 350 years from the date of invention

August 4 350 years from the date of invention

On August 4th the whole world celebrates the 350th anniversary of sparkling wine making technology. It is called "classical" all over the world. History of this unique method starts in the French province of Champagne in the middle of the XVII century. Only after hundred years later the classic method of producing sparkling wines became massive and spread throughout the world. The tradition of celebrating Champagne's Birthday was introduced later on in France in the XX century.

And it was right! What a wonderful occasion to fill the glasses with this delicious pearl wine!

The ARTWINERY's products are no less famous in our country than champagne from France due to the fact that the company uses particular champagne technology more than half a century to produce its own sparkling wines. To celebrate this momentous event, today, on August 4, we propose everyone to raise glasses and together with us congratulate all fans of pearl bubbles, as well as wine and champagne makers around the world!

Historical reference:

The legend says that it was on the 4th of August, 1668, when Father Perignon suggested his abbot brothers to try an unusual wine, which included magic bubbles and transparent foam. That’s how exactly the technology of making sparkling wine was discovered, but to the public was officially opened only 50 years after its invention. This was done by the abbot Fedin in 1718. The first company that produced it on industrial scale was Ryuinar, that started mass champagne sales in 1728.

Champagne became especially popular at the end of the XIX century. Many countries of the world began to manufacture it. Because of such rapid growth, France passed a law to get rid of competitors in the champagne production market. It allowed to assign this name only to wines that have been made directly in the Champagne region. This happened after the First World War.

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